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>> for more information on tvs recent visit to santa fe, new mexico another city visited by her local content vehicle, visit c-span.org/local content. ..a?xx i first came to washington, d.c. in 2000 as a congressional correspondent for the associated press. after spending several years in colombia south carolina and albany new york. now, i am originally from mississippi, the son of two public school teachers come in and being from mississippi, the one thing my parents made sure that i knew was my history. it was almost a state requirement in mississippi to know where you came from. so, when i left mississippi to go to south carolina, i had this desire to history and i studied the history of south carolina. i didn't the same thing when i went to upstate new york. i got involved in learning the african-american history of upstate new york which, by the way, is very vibrant. a lot of the underground railroads ended in upstate new york city have a very vibrant african-american community and history up there. but when i left albany new york to come to washington, d.c., and i knew i
. ♪ >> the city itself is try cultural. we both more authors and poets than most communities. >> welcome to santa fe on booktv. with the help of comcast cable partners for the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary scene and history of new mexico and its capital, a city resting at an altitude of almost 7,000 feet whose name means hope and faith in spanish. we will travel in and around this town of 80,000 to meet with local lawyers to learn about the unique cultures, personalities and history of the city and state that dates back 400 years to the times of colonization attempts by the spanish. all this and more as booktv and our comcast cable partners take you to santa fe. >> we're here in the palace press. james mcgrath morris and these are early printing presses. it seemed like a perk picked -- perfect place to talk about the man revolutionized american newspapers. webmac first started working on a boat people would react with recognition when i said i was writing about joseph pulitzer the clear from their expressions they knew the name but nothing about his life because pulitzer shares his
they reported their experiences and their impressions of santa fe combat the old royal city. and many of them could not believe that a royal city had houses made of mud. there was a little bit of culture shock. others took the exotic feel of the place in the beautiful mountain setting right away and that is true today. santa fe inspires strong emotions. for example a man named chris wilson who is an architectural historian at the university of new mexico wrote a book not too long ago called the myth of santa fe in which he documents the evolution of santa fe's style and quiet the civic fathers decided that we needed to see the look of an earlier time to attract tourism and why he feels that is not necessarily an advantage for santa fe's culture and certainly not to advance authentic indigenous architecture. a famous novel was written in the latter part of the 19th century that is still in print today. it has nothing at all to do with new mexico. it was an accident of chance that the author was general lou wallace who wrote ben-hur, a tale of the christ. the last three chapters were written in
, new mexico and other cities local content vehicles. go to c-span.org/local content. >> up next, someone talks about dinners hosted by winston churchill during and after world war ii, which is used to persuade world were leaders on various matters. it's about 45 minutes. >> good evening. thank you for coming. i'm delighted to see you here to talk about my new book, "dinner with churchill: policy-making at the dinner table." since i book is about the importance of dinner, i will be brief. i just want to whet your appetite so that go buy my book. those try another sentence. i have lived with winston churchill for four years and it was wonderful, even though that took place in the frigid archives at churchill college. i'm often asked ray got the idea for another book on churchill to ask the thousands are to britain. when i read about this fascinating man and his important accomplishments were achieved at dinners. sometimes that lunch is. as i began to wonder why that was so come away most of the deal struck as the famous international conferences held during world war ii were made
with the internet. but zero well, i can book a ticket now and every day we exclaim cover city eight years getting is quickly and easily are a commonplace things that i don't think it's a cheap ato and evaluating it. i'm not so sure of americans remember burkett was a rockefeller or carnegie, yet yet we drive across bridges with steel. that's a carnegie kids. we used cars powered that will, it will rockefeller built them is the financial system and consuming is built on a system developed and created by people at pulitzer. pulitzer came to the united states and unearthing the soldiers and they went to europe and he didn't really see any action. like many veterans after the war he was on foot, often afterwards hard to integrate people into the economy. he ends up in st. louis greek becomes befriended by a major who becomes a senator from missouri this newspaper publisher. pulitzer enters the road. within five years of his dreamy night state companies elected state legislature to stare. it's that kind of speed of immigration 19th century when people would come in. to become successful in a really sh
and -- cities visited by local custom vehicles go to c-span.org / local content. >> you're watching book tv on c-span2. here is our prime-time lineup for tonight. visit c-span.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. >> international financial diplomat william rhodes talks about the current economic and financial challenges facing the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next on book tv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it is great to be back. we enjoyed our relationship that way. tokyo has been the headquarters of our asia-pacific operations for 25 years now. we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot of different ways. one of my colleagues who is with me, doug peterson who just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, pers
of the economy. david grew up in new york outside of new york city and his father was a psychiatrist. he went to harvard college and then got a master's and became an investment banker doing mortgage finance at morgan stanley lehman brothers where he had a front-row seat to fannie and freddie which is something we might hear more from him in the q&a. then he got in television and he's the ceo of the game show network and came very late in life because of his tragedy. he wrote a cover story in atlanta magazine called how health care killed his father, killed my father, and then turned that into a book. it's an incredibly compelling book that i would encourage all of you to buy. there's copies outside. i am constructive to say the next season of american bible challenge, the highest rated show is coming on a few weeks. the game show network can feel like we are not stealing its ceo and we are giving them a plug, too. please join me in welcoming david. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sure everyone here reads your blog but it is a thrill. thank you for that and for the introduction today. and everyb
purchased in its international school in new york city were none of the students are native english speakers. ms. houser tells the story of a student who escaped nepal and attended the international high school. >> so many advocates have amazing stories and the one i wanted to read is about a tibetan boy who left tibet as a little boy, escaped by hiding in a suitcase to travel to the border of nepal and so he and i worked pretty hard on his story to get all the facts straight. the man said motioning at a small suitcase on the ground. it was the fall of 2003, two years before a new one would arrive in international and they're standing on a street. he looked at the man in back of the suitcase. the man was his father's friend, a farmer with a faith filled with worry. black nylon the plastic handlebar, rubber wheels. noong had never touched a suitcase before and inspected it closely. there was chinese flattering on it he could not read. the main compartment was only about two by three feet, the size of a child's coffin. noong was small for 11, but he wasn't that small. he got the firmware must
, and handed over to them. that senior lyndon johnson met in atlantic city, in the chapter i have here, to me it's amazing this is not more news. i have written in detail as i can, he had a nervous breakdown because he's trying to do little delegates from mississippi, and to see all the regular white democrats from mississippi who would publicly pledge to vote for goldwater, the democratic delegates said they would vote for goldwater, and most of them started switching party instantly but he wanted to defeat them anyway. and the mississippi freedom democrats, they walked out because they didn't think it was fair. and karl sanders and one of the conversations you can hear, and john connally, called lyndon johnson and told them if you would even let those two symbolic, the whole south will walk out of this convention because you will be turning the democratic party over to the negro, and letting martin luther king decide who can be a democrat. and johnson almost has a breakdown on the phone there, and basically went to bed for several days and said i'm going to quit. i can't handle this. i'm tr
of my house. i'm only one quarter joking, three quarters citie series wheo this stuff. i think american -- america is the great country on earth but it's inspiring that people are swimming across the river, packing into hundred 20 degrees -- one the 20 degrees truck has come are literally dying to come to this country to participate in our awesome system that we have because of our freedom, because of economic opportunities here, because of, you know, fleeing oppression in many instances in their home country. you know, coming to serve in our military. go to our schools, raise their families and our communities. that is a beautiful thing, and a lot of, you know, republicans who are more socially and culturally conservative identify with that stuff. it's a very inspirational message that we take to those folks. but really what i wanted to kind of delve into it is the anti-immigrant, anti-immigration, some may say at the immigrant groups such as the federation for american immigration reform, center for immigration studies, cis, and numbers u.s.a. these are very effective grassroots lobby
by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when henry kissinger came out and sai
segregated. my dear mayor said that as in as dr. king of the civil rights bill fast, the city and led to build a sports stadium on land it did not own this money to not have for a team it had not located. it cut the milwaukee brewers to come here and become the first professional sports team in the south. dr. king's of the one the term the rated themselves in segregation because of was the right, the core of the constitution, it would liberate the white south. psychologically, economically, and so many of their ways. the question that i want to pose to you is the same question that drove me to say, the second reason, let's do this, try to make decillion to to get people to address the question, why is there such a tremendous disconnect between the broad liberation that has been loosed across the land and relatively low cost historically. people suffered, and many more recently. a lot of violence, and a lot of psychic damage. but for the amount of social change produced it was remarkably civilized. it blesses lots of lots of of the people, and yet in our public discourse today we still
as -- in rural new york higher fertility rates than soon to become new york city. as you have a more urban country, a less rural country. children survive at the higher rate, you're naturally getting people to have fewer babies. again, these are good effects. that's one of the things i try to mention in the book is that, you know, to preserve the overall effect on this creates problems. not every one of the causes is a problem. some are wonderful things. and even wonderful things can, you know, have ill and adverse effects. >> well, why would urbanization lower fertility? >> guest: well, lots of reasons. one which is simple cost. when you urbanize, everything costs more. the higher your population density, the higher your costs of living. higher land costs, higher child care costs, higher education costs, and not just that. as we look back historically and we move from, you know, to an industrial society. in a society children are free work. right. you have seven kids and workingen a a family farm by the time the kids are 10 years old. those are helping hands. when you live in the city and
in getting things done? >> well, walter was an internationalist first class. the expanded the city banks in italy over -- is a great friend of japan. used to go to japan regularly, and i think he, along with paul volcker on the public sector side, where major mentors of mind. and so i think it's fair to say, and you've seen this, that walter was the greatest thinker of his age. and that's what citi is going back to i think at this point in time. we have a lot of present citi bankers, former citibank offers who i know will agree with me. but as far as, you, working with walter come easily got me involved in all of this, and john reed later on, were both i think significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked to a lot of people, i think meeting monday look, having dealt with a number of cases, spend our in 1980 with ago castro. he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt. and i can speak to you about that because we nationalize in cuba, one of the first things we did was nationalize the foreign banks. then he walks on our resource. we're kind of even here. certain
maybe 300. this was a project with the city of chicago and the state of illinois both giving funding from u.s. department of energy and state of illinois capital funds. so in 2009 the governor before anyone was really talking about electric vehicles, he put aside money for ev infrastructure in the capital bill. and some of that money was used for this project. so where the stations are, um, some are with the car-sharing partners, igo, zip car at their locations. usually if there's a car-sharing car, there's a spot open to the public too. they're at oasises, they're at airports, walgreens, whole foods, jewel, they're at the mall. we have a variety of different charging stations. so part of the incentives that i mentioned, right now we have a program through dco, department of commerce and economic opportunity, that offers 50 percent of the charging station and 50 percent of the installation and that's for public stations, residential stations, profit, nonprofit, and we launched this last summer, and we're seeing an intake in those applications. then we also have a program where if you
and got a new law that compelled more cities than to join posses that were hunting people accused of being a runaway slaves who had allegedly escaped into the free states. most of all, the champions of slavery sought ways to detain a control diet almost continuously exercised over the federal government since the american revolution and to prevent above all, prevent others from using the federal government in ways that might have the slaveowner sensuous. in doing this, by the way, they were really aided by a cause of the constitution, the so-called three fifths clause that gave southern whites have your representation in the house of representatives and the room numbers otherwise would have warranted. southerners also saw it this representation in congress and a steadily increasing the number of slave states in the union. soil moisture in the 1840s the davises hursley demanded and lustily cheered both the annexation of texas and war with mexico. which incidentally removed and transferred to the united states only behalf of the national terrain of mexico. southerners cheered this war in hop
and our border security. the very next day in the appropriations committee they said bay city were rolling it all back in the sequestration. >> is the border less secure if you are taking taking away our's >> you reduce the number of voters patrol agents i think you can say yes it does affect their ability to keep out illegal migrants and others trying to enter the country. speier paint a very dire picture and you mentioned the threat of terrorism doesn't wait for these kinds of legislative roadblocks. so with all the diminished capability that you describe how can a country not face a greater threat of a terrorist attack under these circumstances? >> and this fiscal environment where we go to sequestration and possible shutdowns and all the rest, always lacking a budget and regular order so we can't effectively manage and plan, we will always put a priority on maintaining the safety of the american people but what that is going to require and the impact people are going to see, and they will build over the next couple of weeks. you won't see it immediately like a shutdown but it will accr
is secured and others are not as secure. we note or a city as san diego and el paso that count themselves as great improvement in button that used to take knowledge he operational control primarily because they're border stations there. we know there's 1993 miles of border, 653 borders of fencing and one might make the argument he unfenced area is less secure. i would argue against that. one of the things we need to ensure we allow the border patrol to do is to advise us of how they believe using the right resources can effectuated secure border. it is always moving. one of the issues is what we have done such as in 2004 working with senator kerry be provided the answer to the original request by the border patrol and that his equipment. i was the year we presented the chairs, laptops, night goggles, all the enhanced equipment. but we know those kinds of resources are not the only answer to border security. but i would like to see us to master row comes with the use of newtek knowledge he had at the same time as we move forward on to knowledge he and having the border patrol responded in
is it that washington, d.c. gets fed every morning. there's not a farm or a cow or chicken within the city limits. how does it get fed? to someone direct it? does congress or the city counsel instructs that food be brought to the grocery stores? no. it is a spontaneous order, because there are people with demands, because there are people somewhere else with supply. or because there are people willing to supply something because they heard there is demand for it. this huge network, complex network, of satisfying people's needs is created. milton friedman talks about how he went to china, and he was asked by the minister of finance or somebody like that in china, a very smart man, you don't get to the top of a 5000 year old meritocracy without being every smart guy, and a he asked milton friedman who was in charge of material distribution in the united states. friedman said for once he was speechless. who is in charge of material distribution? he said i thought of telling them the chicago board of trade, but that's not really the answer either. the answer of course is no one is in charge of materials d
city. as you have the more urban country into lesra my country a country where children survive at a much higher rate, you are naturally getting people to have fewer babies. again these are good effects. that is one of the things i try to mention in the book is that to observe that with the overall effect on this creates problems and that isn't to say everyone is itself a problem and some of them are wonderful things. even wonderful things can have ill and adverse effects. >> host:>> host: why would urban lower fertility? >> for lots of reasons. one of which is cost. when you are but nice everything costs more. the higher your population density the higher your cost of living and higher land costs hired childcare costs and higher education cost and not just that but if we look back historically and we move from an agrarian society to an industrial society children are free work, right? you have seven kids and to work on a family farm and by the time the kids are 10 years old there is a helping hand. when you live in the city and working in factories and doing increasingly mechan
, and we had some leftovers. those leftovers went to the city, extra stock. it then went as a part of a sister or city program with a local gentleman down to mexico and went to children in mexico. so there you have the literary arts, the performing arts, the educational value and the city cultural outreach all in one volume. form an allegiance to it. if you don't like what they carry, tell them. a lot of what we order comes from suggestions from our customers. i wish you had this book, i wish you had that book. and we'll get it for them. and very often we'll get another copy for the store, and very often that will sell brick quickly. so go to your local store whatever you're trying to buy. see what they have, talk to the people. these are your maybe the neighbors. -- these are your neighbors. >> for more information on booktv's recent visit to santa fe, new mexico, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >>> and now, general stanley mcchrystal discusses his memoir, "my share of the task." in the book the former commander of u.s. forces in afghanistan recounts the major turning points in his
is another theme. of course this is a political town. this is the capitol city and has been the seat of government since the founding 403 years ago. and so the exercise of political power and the development of public policy is another theme. the history of santa fe is distinctive. for one thing, santa fe became a u.s. territory in 1848. and it was a territory for a very long time. the country and washington were reluctant to make santa fe a state. that eventually happened in 1912. new mexico existed as a territory for so long, in someso many ways doesn't seem to fit the rest of the country. and in fact, santa fe proudly, for a long, long time, has described itself as the city different. santa fe was -- and new mexico were explored by the spanish, coming from the south to the north. not from anglos coming from the east to the west. that's one difference. this community that's closely tied to the catholic church, priests accompanied spanish settlers on their way north and establishment of the church and establishment of the community of santa fe are inseparable. of course, this is-was
and shipped to mexico. he is stuck city decides i will negotiate the end of the war in the treaty is sent back to president polk he is outraged and ejected tailored misstate -- administration to compensate for expensive but president polk cannot send the treaty to the senate after he publicly said the terms and it is everything he asked for initially before he changed his mind to get the whole thing. lincoln and his colleagues very, very successful. with the hands on the omnibus postal will and benefits those in his district, he is a player with the issues of "war and peace." >> you have shared a desk with some cool characters. had to interact with these guys? what is a process for finding the next turn in finding the next turn in your narrative? >> it was great fun to research. had to add value to lincoln's story it is only the third book of him in congress in history there are so many books so i will look at letters of his colleagues from the 30th congress most people have not even looked sue their letters. one example of a house mate from abolition house his papers are in harrisburg pennsyl
city. [applause] now, as part of a new program we'll also ensure though that students at the high schools in great falls can graduate with a certificates that would make them attractive candidates for this company as well. so not only is that better jobs but it is better education. i pledge also to bring a more effective government to montana and we're look that already as well. tomorrow for the first time ever montana's checkbook will be online. [applause] what we'll have and we'll still be improving it but we'll have a database so that anyone in montana or anybody across the world for that matter, can look how we're spending the taxpayers money. it is the right thing to do and it will lead to a more effective government. while there are many so things that i can accomplish without your active engagement and partnership, there are other areas where we need each other. we need each other if we're going to make progress. crafting a budget is one of those areas. montana is the envy of other states. other unemployment is lower and our economy is sounder. our state budget, unlike almo
of the world's international cities. people coming from all backgrounds. you are well placed to understand what immigration and the opportunities and contributions that immigrants and those who come to this country for a better opportunity can contribute. and i thank you so very much for your leadership and your presence here today. welcome, fellow texans. i yield back. >> i now turn to the former chairman of the committee and the gentleman from san antonio, texas. mr. smith, ford 15 seconds of welcome. >> yes, i would like to welcome the mayor. as we both know, san antonio is a wonderfully livable, tri-cultural city. and he has done a great job representing us in so many ways. i also want to say that i enjoyed serving with your brother in congress, who was sitting behind you as well. >> welcome to all of our witnesses, and we begin with mr. vivek wadhwa. >> thank you for letting me speak with you. being here in washington dc, everything about being here, we worry about china, whether they are going to be the road to the future. we worry about shortages and everything in the world. when you are
director for the city of chicago and has a special place in her life for it. so thank you, inc. you very much. i would also like to recognize jimmy camp who is here, who's head of the foundation was named for his father, who is the secretary of hud, who i have set in the past with a kind of good working definition of bipartisanship's. it was jack can buy himself. i'm not. [laughter] >> and jimmy was -- he attended the hearing that we had across the country, which were really important in gathering information from across the nation. we thank you in the foundation for your involvement. when the commission began its work, one of the first actions was to examine key demographic trends occurring across the country. an effective housing policy only responds to today's needs, but also anticipates those of the future. our nation is undergoing a profound transformation of society. we are becoming more likely to delay marriage and childbearing and more racially and met with many diverse. members of the echo boom generation, 62 million americans born between 1981 and 1995, they are now beginning t
industrialized city of the northeast. these were european first generations european who had no gun training. they got here and drafted to the army -- [inaudible conversations] people need to know and understand the firearms. that's when the nra was formed. when you get to today, it's interesting because that was urban, rural kind of division. that's the division. a lot of people don't have any familiarity in firearms. if you grew up in downtown anywhere where guns were banned and all of this whether it was gun crime -- is it illogical for you to think that these are bad rather than good? >> for -- [inaudible conversations] >> most of americans it's different. it is cultural. i talk about the cultural war which are id on call. it's also cultural in term of the upbringing and where you come from. i come from wisconsin, and when i was growing up, back in the old days you could take your shotgun -- [inaudible] you could get a card board case for your rifle at the check in counter. we could take our shotguns to school. that didn't happen in new york city. so that's part of the -- different cultu
and cities and i don't remember wisconsin but i know for single women it's anywhere from 19,000 to 29,000 that's just minimal, all of those things that are absolutely necessary. so i think everyone says -- i work with a lot of organizations and everyone will say well, that we need one-on-one especially for like the latino groups and we need one-on-one for everyone really. that is what everybody wants and you sort of know that from your research as well. i think what is really important is senior centers and places where people can actually come for help. finra has this great project on libraries and there are that many of them. i think there are 25 they funded. i've been to a number of them doing programs with them. they are incredible. so there ways that we could do this but there is no coordination, no reach nationally except through these little programs that the national council on aging does a great initiative as well. so i don't know what will happen after this administration. >> thank you. >> senator franken. >> thank you. this topic brings up so many -- so many subjects about
morgan city and from tibideaux. they said why are you here? i said the same reason you are. louisiana workers go everywhere. we're proud to do it, but we would be glad to be close to home, canada and mexico. our refineries which for the first time in our nation's history -- not in history, but for the first time in many years, our manufacturing base is expanding. and finally, i would just say in this colloquy, ask the senator from north dakota, did -- has he had a conversation happen with the oil minister from canada -- i think it's minister olivier, has he talked with him at all recently? because i did have a conversation with him yesterday and i wanted to maybe share that with the senator from north dakota. mr. hoeven: i recently visited with the after, gary dewar, please go ahead and relate your conversation. ms. landrieu: i wanted to say i had a very good conversation with the canadian minister of natural resources. we had a long conversation, ten or 15 minutes and explained the importance of this development for canada. he also said to me what i just shared with you all, that he
common border cities like in the u.s. and mexico that have a daily crossing with hundreds of thousands of people. then you have a big number of regular points of crossing which mexico doesn't have near the sources or the enforcement authorities or the border patrol equivalent to control. so, what the mexican government does is to stop the people as long as they begin to go to mexico and i would like to raise for your attention one issue that hasn't fully valued and consider the mexicans implementing the law and return by more than a hundred thousand people that were coming to this and they were stopped and detained for the mexican immigration to sotheby's and return we have arranged to meet that returned in a safe and orderly manner per 100,001 year. last year it was less of course, 120,000 but still, all of them trying to get into the u.s.. so yes money is needed and training is needed, institutional building is needed and the issue a new legal framework that is a way of looking at migration. now i think the new administration of mexico has the opportunity to implement the law >> let
imaging -- rosa louise parks clutching her purse in those tense moments is not from a city bus number 2857 rolled down cleveland avenue. and we are reminded of the power of simple acts of courage. on an otherwise ordinary evening in montgomery, she did the extraordinary they simply staying put. and in the process, she helped all of us discovers something about ourselves. and about the great regenerative capacity of america. we have had the humility as a nation to recognize past mistakes and we've had the strength to confront those mistakes. but it has always required a public rosa parks to help us get there because of the changes she helped set in motion, entire generations of americans have been able to grow up in a nation where segregated buses only existing museums, were children of every race are free to fulfill their god-given potential and where the simple carpenter's daughter from tuskegee is honored as a national hero. what a story, what a legacy, what a country. thank you. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the majority leader of the united states senate, the honorable harry reid
and greatrandn country and its merited nation's largest city, a community looks at the texas and america of tomorrow.ity immigration for all of us is a more than a political issue. it's who we are as americans. from plymouth rock to ellis island and galveston, texas, to the sandy shores of florida, immigrants have made or is the greatest country in the world. today, however, our immigration system is badly broken. but there is hope. this hearing, and more important thisrtisan legislation that i believe can be enacted becauseie of it shows we are on the cusp e of real progress. the president and a growing the pr for maker so they defamer for whates americans support, comprehensive, commonsense reform. we messed up these three things further strengthen border do security, streamline the legal immigration process so companier get the work they need in this e 21st century global economy and create a path to citizenship to bring the estimated 11 citi undocumented immigrant in this country out ofth the shadows and into the full life of the of th american dream. an texas, we know firsthand the
accomplish. i like to tease people in california there is the global capital content in one city in a car right where's the global capital of technology. for some reason the same country and state is to go couldn't figure out how they needed each other and raskin all of us to make a choice. pick one site has it been the end will benefit if one loses one and. content is technology. technology needs content. i'm working to find ways in which we can bridge this gap and a lot is happening. we're stepping up on the first pages, illegal sites and add brokers, payment processors to make sure we strip the financial advantages that of illegal sites as well. we will have a site opened up in the next three weeks that would give people the chance to learn unintentionally they've been downloading the product without any punitive implications, working on the assumption that most people ever form something they are doing outside of the legal space full text pearce or any number of things occurring in that area. you have asked a question, but i'm not enthusiastic about legislation. read to find ways to a
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
. there is a tensor at the history of this country for the number one effort in the city of washington was to give us the strongest military that any country has nbo to defend against all contingencies. we don't have that anymore. if we go to sequestration is worse. you're from alabama comes locally harder because the number of shops per capita in the defense industry is greater than any other 50 states. >> host: jack next to bobby shaw. hi, jack. >> caller: i have just a quick comment on a previous caller and then a question for senator. a caller called just recently in this segment, saying that mayo clinic didn't take medicare patients. that is incorrect for sure. now senator, you criticized iran for criticizing israel. i ever going criticize israel. i don't much like the state of israel and its not because israel is a nation composed of jewish persons. it's because israel acts unfortunately much like not the state. they have good settlement in occupied territory, which is absolutely against international law and is acknowledged as such by some of the leaders of israel. we have also bombed guys i r
increase in spending. and it's happening every day in cities and counties and states throughout america. they're dealing with far worse reductions than that. and there was no tax increase agreed to at all. not one penny of tax increases. and those reductions in spending are in law. they're in the new baseline that we're now operating on. and to give back that spending without finding reductions in spending elsewhere would be to increase spending above that agreed to in the budget control act. and that is what the democratic outline that we've seen would do. it increases spending. it increases taxes and say don't worry about the increased spending. we've taken care of it. we've raised taxes. so that's the deal. so they raise taxes to pay for the increase. that is in clear violation of the terms of the agreement and the moral agreement we had with the american people. it's in violation of what was told to the american people a little over 18 months ago. and to that extent it's not acceptable. i urge my colleagues not to proceed with this approach. let's find ways to spread out so that mor
economic growth, while contributing to america's energy independence. for instance, the los angeles city council approved a 25 year $1.5 billion project to buy a solar power produced at the indian nation in the southern nevada desert. when it goes online in 2016, it will be the largest solar power plant on tribal land. capturing race to power over 118,000 los angeles homes. in addition to the plan itself, over 900,000 solar panels will be built on a reservation, creating more jobs in industries that tomorrow. one way to ensure projects like this is to promote fair, equitable tax policy. like all government, tribes must collect and manage their own taxes. right now, tribal governments don't have the same taxing authority by states. a flock of governments, we will continue working with federal partners to fix these policies have the economies grow and become a source of strength and her family of nations. sovereignty is how we secure communities and how they can secure nations and how we will secure future. this is our greatest challenge. a quarter of people in poverty, traced the national
, and by his quiet city leadership of the church in uncertain times. people of all nations have been blessed by the sacrifice to sow the seeds of hope, justice and compassion throughout the world in the name of our lord and savior. again, that from house speaker john boehner. in about an hour we will be taking live to an alliance for health reform briefing on medicare policy and the future of the program for an overview looking at how medicare respond to the beneficiaries are, and what changes could occur once the health colossal implemented in 2014. we will have that live at 12:15 eastern on c-span2. the senate begins its work today at 2 p.m. eastern. they will continue work on the violence against women act which could reauthorize the bill for five years. last week senators agreed to consider six amendments to the bill and they will begin voting on those amendments today at 5:30 p.m. eastern. live coverage right here on c-span2. up next, a look at reconstruction in afghanistan. from this morning's "washington journal." >> host: on monday in a last hour of "washington journal" we take a loo
can change that cities good ideas can be heard? >> congressman, it comes down to at the ministry of and congressional demand that the mission itself would be effectively carried out. then there has to be a focus and oversight the best way to do that and whether the department of homeland security is implementing it so the extent that if they go back to the suspects in the defense committee the question is are there better ideas that can infect the incorporated command can refine the methodology to do that other than the general contractor type of approach? as we know, the typical approach of the government particularly the dhs is too high year a big player and the innovative small business people that you're talking about simply become players as subcontractors to read the question is can we find a way to make sure that we are fully engaged in the most innovative small business people as they come up with new and innovative ideas and that is an administrative approach within the congress can rightly demand. >> we now recognize you for a question. >> spending tax dollars wisely li
, so national security issue, so and washington and mexico city the president corporation and building trust, institutional trust mexico understands the views to disagree on something we agree it is such of complicated situation but fighting drugs and trafficking, smugglers, a long way to go but we are much better when fingerpointing would have been with those differences are channels and many times to move on the agenda. but one clarification i am here is a private citizen not public official. when i talk about we it is because it is not we is them. i am hoping you take that into account. what is obvious is the geography with mexico and the destiny of loss. including rocks from columbia, arms not just central america but all over the world salute that is a huge issue. so with needs of social development the flows of people crossing territories as out papers to get to the u.s.. at the same time the source of millions of americans went out of 10 are there and now we received that now is that the core of our own perception of what are mexicans. this graph i did not have time to update bu
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